Funding from the Convocation Trust

The Convocation Trust originated from the University of London Convocation, the association of graduates established by Charter in 1858, which ran until 2003. The Trust was constituted in 1953 with funds provided from members of Convocation and continues to be supported by generous donations from alumni and philanthropists.

Exterior of Senate House

The Convocation Trust at a glance...

The object of the Trust is to apply the Trust’s money “for educational and other charitable purposes beneficial to the members and community” of the University and its Member Institutions.

The Trustees have made it their mission to allocate the Trust’s funds in support of projects which will promote the purposes of the University and provide demonstrable and substantial benefits to the University community as a whole, or to members of that community.

To that end the Trustees meet twice yearly to consider bids for funding from across the University, and those which are adjudged as best meeting these criteria are awarded financial support grants.

Examples of the kinds of projects that make bids to the Trust are illustrated below.

Bride of Frankenstein

Lighting for the SAS Living Literature Frankenstein event

The Trust contributed £4,500 towards the lighting for the School of Advanced Study's event that explored the world of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

Senate House Library, Shakespeare 400 Metamorphosis Exhibition, Staircase Mural

Senate House Library - Shakespeare 2016 and exhibition materials

The Trust awarded £50,000 to ensure that Senate House Library's Shakespeare 2016 exhibition was a great success.

Student Central

Student Central refurbishment

The Trust awarded £15,240 for additional refurbishment work undertaken on student central.

Grants awarded by the Convocation Trust

Full details of all grants awarded by the Convocation Trust.

Find out more

Convocation Trust Application Process

Convocation Trust Application Form DOCX 24.51 KB
Convocation Trust statement of principles and working practices PDF 83.23 KB