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Dr Pete Cannell

Pete's original degree was in Mathematics.  He completed a PhD in applied mathematics that developed the theoretical understanding of aircraft noise generation and continued to work as a postdoctoral researcher in the same field for a couple of years.  Following this, he trained as a teacher of mathematics and taught at all levels of the education system, school, college and university.  

Having moved to Scotland Pete started to work part-time as a maths tutor for the Open University (OU) and began to get involved in small research and evaluation projects outside my subject discipline.  In 1994 he moved to a full-time post as Senior Counsellor with the Open University in Scotland.  This provided more opportunities to engage in educational practice and research.  Following a reorganisation of roles and support structures at the OU he moved to Edinburgh’s Queen Margaret University as an educational developer and lecturer in the Centre for Academic Practice.  

He returned to the OU in Scotland in 2005 as Deputy Director with responsibility for Learning, Teaching and Curriculum.  In that role he led the OU’s Learning Development Team developing projects across a broad spectrum: external partnerships and research in areas of widening participation, college/university transitions, employability, skills, work-based learning, Open Educational Practice and e- and blended learning.  

Pete retired from the full-time role in 2014.  Shortly after retirement, however, the opportunity arose to work as a consultant on a three-year, cross-sector project funded by the Scottish Funding Council.  Opening Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) concluded at the end of July 2017; the project was distinctive in considering the use of open educational resources (OER), and in particular the use of open courses, through a social justice lens. Pete's recent research has been at the interface of open practice, OER development, widening participation and educational transitions.