Knowledge Diplomacy Seminar Series

This new seminar series co-organised with SOAS and CDE, along with the support of ICR, focuses on three key areas of global significance where Knowledge Diplomacy (KD) plays a key role: 

  • The COVID19 pandemic 
  • Climate Change Policy and Sustainability 
  • The Future of Universities as key sites for knowledge production and sharing 

This is an opportunity for academics, policymakers and students to join an exciting conversation and exchange ideas to help inform a path forward for the University of London’s knowledge diplomacy approach. 

Knowledge Diplomacy

Knowledge Diplomacy Seminar Series

This new seminar series co-organised with SOAS and CDE, along with the support of ICR, focuses on three key areas of global significance where Knowledge Diplomacy (KD) plays a key role: 

  • The COVID19 pandemic 
  • Climate Change Policy and Sustainability 
  • The Future of Universities as key sites for knowledge production and sharing 

This is an opportunity for academics, policymakers and students to join an exciting conversation and exchange ideas to help inform a path forward for the University of London’s knowledge diplomacy approach. 

Description

Knowledge Diplomacy (KD) is highly relevant in both academic and policy circles addressing, the major issues of our time, relating to the sharing and openness of knowledge between nations and multilateral agencies with both theoretical and practical dimensions. 

The need to share knowledge globally, at speed and with trust, and to develop common-interest-building strategies through Science/Knowledge Diplomacy has never been greater as we work through the global pandemic and at the same time face up to the climate crisis. 

The concept of Knowledge Diplomacy gives us a lens through which to consider the future of international knowledge production and collaboration. The intersection of international higher education, international relations, Science/Knowledge Diplomacy and nation branding is complex. 

Higher Education with its knowledge production and analytical capability and transnational networks is key. 

Bringing together speakers from various universities, this new seminar series co-organised with SOAS and CDE, along with the support of ICR, will aim to create a space to look back at some of the challenges and exchange ideas on this broad topic that is knowledge diplomacy. 

The first part of this series will first explore the challenges that COVID-19 and climate change have exposed in the information economy and ecology. The second part of this series will look at the increasing importance of international collaboration and transfer of knowledge, as well as defining the future of Universities as key sites for knowledge production. 

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Schedule of events

23 June 2021 - Knowledge Diplomacy and the Pandemic

The policy choices we make now will be crucial to the prospects for the global future. Recent global research has suggested that COVID-19 has shone a bright light on issues of how current economic models handle information and knowledge. 

Some of these are familiar issues that have long been understood but not acted upon effectively – for example, the danger that current systems of intellectual property and patent protection are actually inimical to delivering a cost-effective vaccine available to all, whereas treating knowledge as a public good is much more likely to deliver efficient outcomes for the entire global population. 

COVID-19 has demonstrated that traditional models of knowledge production and dissemination are failing us; scientific knowledge is becoming weaponised and hyper-partisan, and confidence in this knowledge is falling.  

The aim of the event is to explore the role of knowledge diplomacy in the pandemic with contributions from leading experts and an invitation to policymakers and students to participate and share their views.  

Missed it? Watch the event recording.

25 June 2021 - Knowledge Diplomacy and Climate Change

Despite the crucial dependency on developing a shared global understanding of the science of climate change, and the role of science diplomacy in ensuring access to knowledge, promoting it, and influencing public opinion, there is very little research on how science diplomacy can be utilised to tackle global challenges such as climate change. 

There are also questions about the effectiveness of science diplomacy. In the international climate regime, the issues of science intermingle with those of diplomacy and interact with them. For example, examination of the IPCC highlights that the extent to which diplomats understand and use scientific knowledge, as well as represent contested national interests during major negotiations, can jeopardise science diplomacy’s effectiveness. 

The consensus that exists among scientists about the origins and long‐term risks of climate change does not necessarily translate into a consensus among diplomats over an appropriate course of action, raising questions over the contribution of science/knowledge diplomacy. 

The aim of the event is to explore the role of knowledge diplomacy in relation to the climate change crisis, with contributions from leading experts and an invitation to policymakers and students to participate and share their views. 

Missed it? Watch the event recording.

30 September 2021 - Knowledge Diplomacy and the Pandemic Part II

Details TBC

28 October 2021 - The Future of the University

Details TBC