A New Horizon for Urban Scholarship

In its first year of existence, the Banister Fletcher Global Fellowship, offered in partnership by the University of London Institute in Paris, the Bartlett School of Architecture (UCL) and Queen Mary University of London, has been delighted to see Dr Min Kyung Lee's programme in Urban Quantification receive such strong interest from scholars and students around the world.

A New Horizon for Urban Scholarship

In its first year of existence, the Banister Fletcher Global Fellowship, offered in partnership by the University of London Institute in Paris, the Bartlett School of Architecture (UCL) and Queen Mary University of London, has been delighted to see Dr Min Kyung Lee's programme in Urban Quantification receive such strong interest from scholars and students around the world.

Opening with a keynote lecture ‘The Geometry of Modern Paris’, the first part of this programme gathered architectural and art historians, digital humanities scholars and colonial historians to discuss the significance of methods of counting and displaying quantitative data for the organization and entrenchment of social relations. After Dr Min Kyung Lee’s meticulous attention to maps and the shape they dictate, the panel conversation ‘Mapping and Measures’ was a lively exchange that spanned Canadian land rights to GPS technology, the registers of the slave trade to Rem Koolhaas’s vision of and for Lagos. You can catch up with both of these events here

The second part of this series will start on Tuesday 18 May with Dr Min Kyung lee’s second keynote lecture ‘The Quantification of Urban Spaces’ in which she will be looking at Interwar France and how military methodology dictated the emerging field of urbanism. See here for more details and to register. 

This will be followed by a second panel conversation and workshop on ‘Speculation and Mismeasures’, gathering a group of international scholars from the fields of architecture and art history, urbanism, sociology and law. Together they will be discussing how practices of quantification have created speculative practices on economic and political terms. How have these practices impacted on the world, our lives, and our relationships? How have they brought confusion, distortions and misunderstandings while claiming clarity and transparency? See here for more details and to register. 

Kuala Lumpur city view, tall skyscrapers with haze. Photo by Ishan SeeFromTheSky from Unsplash

Banister Fletcher Fellowship

The University of London is also pleased to announce that applications are invited for the second iteration of this Fellowship opportunity.

All events will be delivered online. The workshops are aimed at graduate students and junior faculty drawn from the partner institutions of ULIP, UCL and QMUL, but participation is welcome from interested parties coming from other places, and if you are interested in participating or have further questions about this Fellowship, you are warmly invited to get in touch with Anna-Louise Milne on anna-louise.milne@ulip.lon.ac.uk