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Think differently: how a psychology degree can open up a world of career options

By studying psychology, you will gain a strong understanding of the human mind – from how a child’s brain develops, to making sense of people’s behaviour and interpreting the world around us. But you will also develop a set of hugely transferable skills that are much in-demand in a number of different careers. Whether you want to work in science, counselling, youth services or HR, your degree will give you an excellent foundation.

Written by Allie Fitzgibbon |

Man and woman speaking in an office.
Psychology graduates are notably flexible in the workplace, going on to roles in education, healthcare, social care and criminal and legal services.

The University of London in partnership with Member Institution, King’s College London, and the world-renowned Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IOPPN), offers a ground-breaking degree in psychology. This fully online programme can be studied from anywhere in the world and is designed to be flexible, so that you can study around work, family and other commitments.

At the heart of the degree is the cutting-edge research of the IOPPN and you will learn about the work of some of the world’s leading experts in the field, accessing the most up-to-date theory and using real clinical examples to bring it to life.

With modules such as ‘Learning, Personality and Intelligence,’ ‘Health and Addictive Behaviours’ and ‘Gender and Mental Health’ you will be introduced to a broad spectrum of possible careers within psychology – from forensic psychology to health psychology or educational psychology.

However, the degree will also enable you to develop a wide range of skills that are applicable to many other careers. We spoke to Senior Careers Consultant, Liz Wilkinson at the University of London Careers Service, about how a degree in psychology prepares you for success, wherever your ambition may lead you.

“Some of the core skills you learn in this degree include data analysis, problem solving, scientific and statistical literacy and effective communication. These are hugely transferable to a number of different careers and sectors, and psychology graduates are notably flexible in the workplace, going on to roles in education, healthcare, social care and criminal and legal services.”

Reach out to someone and invite them for a virtual coffee – it’s important to hear directly from professionals working in your dream field before you start your journey towards that ambition.

In fact, according to UK graduate careers website ‘Prospects’, being a psychologist was only the eighth most popular career for psychology graduates, with ‘Childcare, health and education’ and ‘Legal, social and welfare’ listed as the most common employment sectors.

The University of London Careers Service has been providing careers guidance to universities for more than 100 years and is the largest higher education careers and employability service in Europe.

They offer an all-year programme of regular live and interactive webinars and careers drop-ins, open to all students. In these webinars you can explore your careers options and improve your job-hunting techniques in a global, trans-disciplinary classroom of your fellow students, and benefit from the insights of your student peer community.

You can even enhance your degree transcript by completing the University of London Career & Employability Micro-Modules. You will explore topics such as developing a career plan for the changing work world of the Fourth Industrial Revolution and improving your careers decision making and self-presentation in CVs, interviews and Linked-In profiles. On completion of each micro-module, you are awarded a Career Futures Certificate of Completion, which will be recognised on your degree transcript. 

If you have a specific career in mind after you graduate, Liz advises speaking to professionals in the field first.

She said: “Check your assumptions about what a particular job or career offers and how it might have been changed by the pandemic. Take the opportunity to talk to people working in the field and find out what the day-to-day reality is like and what the biggest growth areas are. Reach out to someone and invite them for a virtual coffee – it’s important to hear directly from professionals working in your dream field before you start your journey towards that ambition.”

Have conversations with people working in different sectors within your own local context. Doing that local research and networking will save you time and really benefit you in the future.

If, on the other hand, you’re unsure what may be the best career path for you, the University of London Careers Service also offers a rich resource bank of online careers resources and recordings to help you maximise your career management and professional skills. 

Liz added: “The two best pieces of advice I would give any student are: make full use of the resources we have on offer. Join our webinars and take the opportunity to learn from our alumni who are a big part of our careers offer and can give you invaluable insights. And secondly, seek to build up a network in your own region. Have conversations with people working in different sectors within your own local context. Doing that local research and networking will save you time and really benefit you in the future.”

Explore the wealth of opportunities available to you with a BSc in Psychology from the University of London.

Please note, in some countries, qualifications earned by distance and flexible learning may not be recognised by certain authorities or regulators for the purposes of public sector employment, chartered psychology status or other further study. We advise you to explore the local recognition status before you register.