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This scholarship felt like winning the lottery

The Malaysian scholarship winner, Leow Ho Eng, on embracing once-in-a-lifetime opportunities, fulfilling a dream, and future goals.

Written by Peter Quinn |

LLB graduate Leow Ho Eng pictured in Senate House
"Through the King's Careers Service I landed my first job in London as a court reporter, attending hearings and doing transcriptions."

Leow Ho Eng studied at Brickfields Asia College in Malaysia for the first year of his University of London LLB. 

He was awarded the Malaysian scholarship to study Years 2 and 3 of his LLB at King’s College London, having achieved the best overall results in Malaysia in Year 1 University of London LLB exams.

Recalling his time at BAC, Leow notes that he enjoyed Criminal law and Public law the most. 

“Criminal law tied in with my original ambition of becoming a police officer. It was important in understanding the criminal justice system and why people act in a certain way. As for Public law, it was interesting to observe how the system of government, or how a democracy, should be properly run."

If I hadn't been awarded the scholarship I would have missed out on once-in-a-lifetime opportunities, such as working in the Royal Courts of Justice and the Serious Fraud Office.

A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity: the Malaysian scholarship

"When I first got the news I was slightly dumbfounded. When I got the call from the Director, Mr Simon Askey, I thought it was a prank! My family were so happy, it was so unexpected. This scholarship felt like winning the lottery.

"I imagine that if I hadn't been awarded the scholarship I would have missed out on once-in-a-lifetime opportunities, such as working in the Royal Courts of Justice and the Serious Fraud Office. Working at these important institutions allowed me an insider view of how they operate in the justice system. In fact, being in the front seat of both, seeing and applying these laws, is an invaluable and irreplaceable experience by itself.”

The academic journey: a different approach

"When I first came to the UK, there were a few issues in terms of the transition, because the education system and the approach were slightly different. For example, the tutorial system at King’s was much more interactive and it involved a much higher degree of self-study.

"I adjusted by observing my new friends at King's – they were quite supportive, and the lecturers as well. They took an interest in me when I told them about my background and the fact that I'd transferred. They accommodated me wherever possible to ensure that I had a smooth transition to King’s."

Leow pictured at graduation with his LLB classmate, Jessica Chan
"Attending graduation felt like a dream. My family were really proud of me – they were so supportive of me, even back in Malaysia."

Studying in the heart of legal London

Law has been taught at King’s since 1831. The School of Law is right in the heart of legal London with Parliament, government departments, the Royal Courts of Justice, Law Society, Inns of Court and offices of major global law firms all just a short distance away.

"Before King's I'd dreamed of coming to London,“ Leow notes. “It was a dream fulfilled for me. Whenever I passed by the Inns of Court it reminded me to study! But, more importantly, it inspired me to keep on following my ambitions.

"I was very impressed by the resources at King’s – the amount of eResources and the fact that the lectures are recorded. Most of the academics had written textbooks. They also took you seriously and were quite willing to answer any questions we had.

"Personally, I found that my advocacy skills improved through Mooting opportunities which I took advantage of. That was a very rewarding experience. There were also a lot of opportunities to develop our professional skills. Through the King's Careers Service I landed my first job in London as a court reporter, attending hearings and doing transcriptions."

In the next couple of years, I will become a lawyer and may practice in the field of white collar crime or regulatory law.

Future goals

"Attending graduation felt like a dream. My family attended and they were really proud of me – they were so supportive of me, even back in Malaysia.

“In the next couple of years, I will become a lawyer and may practice in the field of white collar crime or regulatory law. Further down the road, I aspire to contribute to the civil and political life of Malaysia and the global community.”